These letters were written by Harlan Page Martin (1845-1923), the son of Stephen Martin (1810-1857) and Amarilla Ingalls (1815-1903) of Granville, Washington County, New York. Other members of the Martin household included Harlan’s siblings: Mason Pierce Martin (b. 1847), Amia Louisa Martin (b. 1850), and Charles Hughs Martin (b. 1852). Two older and siblings had previously died young. These were Onedine Augusta Martin (1841-1844) and Richard M. J. Martin (1844-1848).

How Harlan might have looked
How Harlan might have looked

In the letters, Harlan frequently refers to his grandmother who was Abigail L. (Baker) Ingalls (b. 1788), the widow of Reuben Ingalls (1786-1848). Harlan wrote all of these letters to his widowed mother, Amarilla (Ingalls) Martin, who re-married in 1867 to Samuel Hall — a blacksmith and farmer from Hartford, New York.

Harlan was married in 1867 to Flavana A. Whitcomb (1840-19xx), the daughter of Flynn Whitcomb and Mary Martin of Hartford, New York. Prior to the war, Harlan was a farmer. In 1880, Harlan resided in Truckee, California where he was employed as a logger. In 1910 he was living in Butte, California, and employed as a lumber manufacturer. Late in life he resided in Sacramento where he died in 1923.

A collection of some 60 letters written by Harlan P. Martin to his mother during the Civil War were sold at auction recently and these were subsequently sold off one by one or in small lots. From the letters we learn that Harlan also kept diaries of his wartime experiences but I have not found any mention of these in google searches.

The Collection of 60+ letters written by Harlan Page Martin during the Civil War
The Collection of 60+ letters written by Harlan Page Martin during the Civil War
Harlan's Service Record
Harlan’s Service Record
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